Omit adjective in the second sentence? [closed]

I am wondering if the following two sentence are correct.

  1. We can divide children on the ground into two groups: those playing
    soccer, and those not.
  2. We can divide children on the ground into two groups: those playing
    soccer, and those who do not.

If both are correct, which is better?

Update:

Thanks for Brad’s comment, for comparison, the second sentence should be:

2*. We can divide children on the ground into two groups: those playing
soccer, and those who are not.

Update 2:
And as he points out, it is better to say “We can divide the children in the yard into two groups: those playing soccer, and those who are not.” or “We can divide the children in the yard into two groups: those playing soccer, and those who are not.”

Answer

Both are nearly correct (we just need to define things a little) albeit the meanings are questionable.

The meaning has changed in the second example

1.We can divide children on the ground into two groups: those playing soccer, and those not.

There are 2 groups of children. One group is playing soccer the other group is not playing soccer at this time.

2.We can divide children on the ground into two groups: those playing soccer, and those who do not.

There are 2 groups of children. One group is playing soccer the other group does not (ever) play soccer.

Also the choice of the wording “on the ground” is less than desirable. The meaning is not appropriate in this situation.

on the ground; Cambridge English Dictionary among the general public:

It would be clearer to rewrite the sentences as;

We can divide the children into two groups: those playing soccer, and those not.

We can divide the children into two groups: those playing soccer, and those who do not.

Note I have added the word The as Children in this case are a definitive article

the; Cambridge English Dictionary definite article: the definite article (PARTICULAR)
​used before a noun to refer to a particular thing because it is clear which thing is intended:

That answers your question. However only you know what meaning you intended.

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