Using “reason for” without using “having” after “for”

I have this phrase:

Another reason for having poor performance earlier but better
performance in later sessions…

I just wonder if there is a way to get rid of “having” or is it necessary? How about something like this:

Another reason for the poor performance initially and better performances in subsequent sessions…

I feel like in this case initially does not fit well. Any suggestions for building this sentence correctly and concisely?

Answer

The main thing that’s right with those examples is (another) reason for

… poor performance earlier but better performance in later sessions… is more of a problem than a context.

… the poor performance initially and better performances in subsequent sessions… is less of a problem and still, more a problem than a context.

having makes little relevant difference but if you could correct the rest then it prolly would be better to drop having.

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