What’s the meaning of “to” in “Love you to”? [closed]

There’s a Beatles song called “Love You To” (not To Love You nor Love You Too). I’ve never understood this grammar construction and I don’t understand what the title actually means. Is it just a poetry resource to say “To Love You”? Or does putting the “to” at the ens of a sentence change its meaning somehow? Maybe is it a way to emphasize? Are there other examples of putting “to” at the end? Thank you.

Answer

It shows there is an implied ending that the listener already understands. For example, if I said, “Would you like me to give you a ride to the airport,” you might respond, “I’d love you to” or maybe just “Love you to.” I know that you’d love me to … take you to the airport.
As for what the title means, well, you’ll have to figure out what the Beatles would love you to do.

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